The Best ASX Value Stocks
to buy Now In
june 2024

Check out our Industry Experts’ report and
analysis on the Best Value Stocks right now on the ASX

The Best ASX Value Stocks to buy Now In june 2024

Check out our Industry Experts’ report and analysis on the Best Value Stocks right now on the ASX

What are ASX value shares?

Value stocks are akin to hidden treasures in the stock market. They are shares of companies that seem to be priced lower than they deserve, based on their business past performance. Imagine a scenario where a company faces a temporary hiccup – like a one-off bad news story or a minor setback in earnings. These incidents can unfairly drag down the stock price, making the company look less valuable than it truly is.

Think of intrinsic value as the real worth of a company, calculated by considering its assets, profits, debts, and potential for growth. When a stock's market price is lower than its real worth, it's like finding a high-quality item on sale. The reasons for this underpricing can be varied: sometimes the market overreacts to short-term issues, or investors might just not be paying enough attention to the company's strengths.

Why invest in Value Stocks?

Investing in value stocks is like betting on a market correction. Investors who pick these stocks believe that eventually, the market will wake up to the company's true value, leading to a rise in the stock and share price and a potential profit for those who invested early. This approach isn't about quick gains; it's a patient strategy that requires a deep dive into the company's financial health and future outlook.

Value investing is all about long-term thinking. It operates on the principle that while the stock market can be shortsighted, focusing too much on current trends or temporary setbacks, it eventually comes around to recognize a company's true value. This method of investing, made famous by legends like Warren Buffett, is about seeing beyond the market's mood swings and focusing on the solid, enduring qualities of a company.

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What to Look for When Investing in Value Shares

Investing in value shares requires a strategic approach, blending financial acumen with a keen eye for undervalued opportunities. Key to this pursuit is analyzing financial ratios, which act as reliable indicators of a stock’s potential value.

The Price-to-Earnings Ratio (P/E) is foundational. It juxtaposes a company's stock price against its earnings. Generally, a lower P/E suggests that a stock might be undervalued relative to its earnings, signalling a potential investment opportunity. Similarly, the Price-to-Book Ratio (P/B) provides insight by comparing the stock’s market value to its book value, where a lower ratio can often point to undervaluation.

The EV/Revenue Ratio further enriches this analysis, relating the stock price to the company's revenue. A lower ratio here can indicate a stock is undervalued in terms of its sales. Equally important is the Debt-to-Equity Ratio, which helps gauge a company's financial health by assessing its debt level in relation to equity.

Beyond these metrics, a thorough examination of the company’s business model, market position, and financial stability is essential. This includes scrutinizing such key factors as its market share, profitability, cash flow, and the effectiveness of its management team. Understanding the reason behind a stock’s undervaluation is critical; it could be a temporary market sentiment or a more intrinsic undervaluation.

Also, ensure the stock has adequate liquidity for smooth trading. Adopting a margin of safety by investing at a price below the estimated intrinsic value of mature company can mitigate risk and turn out to be a good investing strategy.

5 Best ASX Value Stocks to Buy Now in 2024


Coles (ASX: COL)

Coles operates its namesake supermarkets as well as bottle shops Liquorland, First Choice Liquor Market, and Vintage Cellars. It also has the Flybuys program that seeks to reward loyal customers with various points redemption options and also makes more money for the company.


GrainCorp (ASX: GNC)

GrainCorp is one of the world's leading grain traders, accounting for over 50% of export trades. As its name implies, it specialises in grains, collecting, transporting, processing, storing and trading them. People always need food, regardless of the weather or the state of the economy.



Qantas (ASX: QAN)

This is a controversial inclusion, we admit. After all, there's the saying that investors should 'never buy an airline' and Qantas is struggling with fleet shortages and reputational issues. Nonetheless, it made a $1.4bn profit last year, a $1.2bn profit in the first half of this year and is trading at a P/E of 5.5x.


Inghams (ASX: ING)

Inghams is a poultry company that is up 18% in the last year but is trading at an FY25 P/E of less than 12x. There is a lot to like about this company. It possesses many positive traits including a market-leading position, a long history and being in a recession-proof industry.


QBE (ASX: QBE)

Valued attractively at 9.8x P/E for FY25, QBE is one of the world's top 20 insurance companies, employing over 14,500 people in 37 countries. It offers both consumer insurance products but also business insurance. We're not just taking insurance for small coffee shops,


5 Best ASX Value Stocks to Buy Now in 2024

Coles (ASX: COL)

Coles operates its namesake supermarkets as well as bottle shops Liquorland, First Choice Liquor Market, and Vintage Cellars. It also has the Flybuys program that seeks to reward loyal customers with various points redemption options and also makes more money for the company. With the rise of eCommerce, Coles has also begun offering online shopping services.

Yes, Coles may be a supermarket duopoly with Woolworths (ASX: WOW). But the fact is, its trades are barely 60% of the equity value of Woolworths, even though it is growing faster right now. It made 4.9% sales growth in the first 2 months of CY24, while its rival grew just 1.5%.

GrainCorp (ASX: GNC)

GrainCorp is one of the world's leading grain traders, accounting for over 50% of export trades. As its name implies, it specialises in grains, collecting, transporting, processing, storing and trading them. People always need food, regardless of the weather or the state of the economy.

GrainCorp has benefited from the Russia-Ukraine war, with those countries making up a third of global wheat exports and other nations looking for alternative sources. It trades at just 18x P/E for FY25.

Qantas (ASX: QAN)

This is a controversial inclusion, we admit. After all, there's the saying that investors should 'never buy an airline' and Qantas is struggling with fleet shortages and reputational issues. Nonetheless, it made a $1.4bn profit last year, a $1.2bn profit in the first half of this year and is trading at a P/E of 5.5x.

We are optimistic that the forthcoming Project Sunrise flights can benefit its bottom line in the way that its new ultra-long-haul flights (such as Perth to London) have had on its bottom line.

Inghams (ASX: ING)

Inghams is a poultry company that is up 18% in the last year but is trading at an FY25 P/E of less than 12x. There is a lot to like about this company. It possesses many positive traits including a market-leading position, a long history and being in a recession-proof industry.

For much of the pandemic and its aftermath, it has battled higher input costs, including feed, packaging and freight, as well as supply chain challenges. And even though Inghams is the largest poultry company, its customers did have alternatives and its competitors had their supply.

But now, those difficult times are over. In August 2023, the company released its FY23 results and it reported a $60.4m profit, up 72% in 12 months. This was despite Poultry Volumes going 0.4% backward because the company was able to pass on cost increases to its customers. It delivered a ROIC of 19%, up from 13.7% the year before.

QBE (ASX: QBE)

Valued attractively at 9.8x P/E for FY25, QBE is one of the world's top 20 insurance companies, employing over 14,500 people in 37 countries. It offers both consumer insurance products but also business insurance. We're not just taking insurance for small coffee shops, we're talking insurance for companies like big oil rig operators. In uncertain times, you want any certainty you can get and QBE provides this.

In CY23, it recorded 8.8% growth in its gross written premium and a 10% jump in net insurance revenue. Pleasingly, it can keep its costs under control with its expense ratio only growing from 11.7% to 11.8%, making a profit more than double the year before and almost doubling its Return on Equity from 8.3% to 16%.

Pros and Cons of Investing in Value Stocks Stocks

Value stocks often present a golden opportunity for substantial capital growth. They are like hidden treasures, waiting for the market to rediscover their true worth.

These stocks typically come with lower risk and less volatility than their growth counterparts, adding a layer of stability to your portfolio. Additionally, many are well-established companies that reward investors with regular dividends, providing a steady income stream.

However, it demands patience. Sometimes, it feels like a waiting game, as share prices of these stocks might take a while to reflect their real value. There's also the risk of falling into a 'value trap,' where a stock seems undervalued but is actually justifiably priced low due to fundamental issues. For thrill-seekers in the stock market, value stocks might lack the excitement of rapidly growing companies.

Value Stock vs. Growth Stock: Which Is Better?

The debate between best value stocks and growth stocks is like choosing between a steady, reliable old friend and an exciting, unpredictable new acquaintance.

Value stocks, with their lower risk profile and potential for steady gains, are like the tortoise in the race, offering consistent dividends, lower price, and the thrill of uncovering undervalued gems.

On the other hand, growth stocks tend to be full of energy and potential for rapid expansion, though they come with a higher risk of volatility and uncertainty. The choice really boils down to your personal investment style, risk tolerance, and time horizon.

Young, risk-tolerant investors might lean towards growth stocks for their explosive potential, while more conservative investors might prefer the relative safety and steady returns of value stocks. A balanced portfolio often includes a mix of both, aligning with the investor's long-term financial goals and risk appetite.

How to Choose the Right ASX Value Stocks?

Selecting the right ASX value stocks requires you to start by sifting through financial ratios to spot potential undervalued players. Metrics like P/E, P/B, P/S ratios, and debt-to-equity ratios are your tools for this part of the hunt.

Then, you delve into the company's story, examining its business model, market position, and financial stability. Think of it as understanding the character of the company. Does it have a competitive edge, a solid track record, financial services, and a team capable of steering the ship through turbulent waters?

Next, consider the broader picture - what's the potential for revaluation, and is there a margin of safety in your own investment strategy? Remember, liquidity is key for smooth entry and exit. This approach requires patience, as the true value of these stocks may take time to unfold, and thorough research to avoid falling into value traps.

Are ASX Value shares right for you?

Deciding if ASX value shares are your cup of tea depends on several personal factors. If you're a long-term player in the investment game, value stocks can be a great match. They offer a less volatile journey, often with the added bonus of dividend income.

This can be particularly appealing if you're risk-averse or nearing a stage in life where steady income is more valuable than high-risk, high-reward scenarios. For the contrarian investors who relish in going against the grain and digging deep into company fundamentals, value shares are like a playground of opportunities.

However, if you're drawn to the fast-paced, high-growth environment of newer industries and startups, or if patience isn't your strong suit, value stocks might not align well with your investment style. Investing in value stocks is more about steady growth and dividends than quick gains.

FAQs on Investing in Value Stocks

Value stocks are typically underpriced compared to their fundamentals, offering potential for appreciation. Growth stocks, on the other hand, represent companies with strong potential for revenue and earnings growth, often trading at higher price-to-earnings ratios due to anticipated future gains.

Our Analysis on ASX Value Stocks

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